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November 2017

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Photography

ysilme in photo_scavenger

Fruit & Vegetable

This was originally just my pick for "fruit", as in "the fruits of my labour", for I've schlepped quite a few watering cans to the plants which produced these. But as I'm so behind and the prompt "vegetable" came now up, too, I'm cheating and using this pic for both. :p

The hokkaido has a nice, average size, about the size of two or three of my fists. The tomato came as a big surprise, though. I bought my tomato plants at a local collector of tomato seeds, who grow and abundance of varieties. Since the conditions for tomatos at our garden are bad, I only take four and prefer cocktail varieties as large varieties don't ripen in our very varied summers. She gave me a fifth as a present, as she had gotten seeds without description, provided I accepted to not have an idea what to get. It's called "the oriental", and it produces HUGE fruits, as you can see. That one was the largest, but just by a margin - I made a complete tomato salad for two just out of that fruit, as it's also completely filled, without any water and nearly no seeds.
Incidently, the first half of our summer has been so cold that my cocktail tomatoes didn't really grow well, don't produce many fruits until today, and don't have the intense taste related to home-grown tomatoes. But that surprise plant, which also has to consent with living in a most adverse spot, produces one fruit after another (and always only one at a time)  - and they taste really good. By now, it has given easily doubly as much fruit in sheer weight as the other four plans together...

Comments

I hadn't heard of hokkaidos before. Both veggies look delicious!
I'm sure you have, they're so common, but probably just called differently from what I found - the online dictionaries sometimes mix things oddly up. They can be eaten with their skin and cook very quickly, which makes them so well-liked.

Edit: I found these other names for them: red kuri squash, Japanese Squash, Baby Red Hubbard Squash, or the Uchiki Kuri Squash. Does that help?

Edited at 2016-09-09 11:15 pm (UTC)
Red kuri sounds familiar.
I thought the hokkaido was an onion *g* I had to google hokkaido to discover it is a type of squash.
Given the size of the hokkaido, that tomato is very impressive.
I've never seen an onion of that colour. The shape certainly fits! :)
That tomato is most impressive - especially as the smaller ones didn't do as well as usual!
We kept the smaller ones on the veranda, where it is warmest and most wind-protected - but doesn't get full sun all day. No problem in a regular, warm summer, but with the very wet and cold June, they hadn't good chances to start properly growing. The big one is in a very exposed, windy spot, but thankfully doesn't mind, and in exchange gets all the sun that's available.
It is so lovely to see a 'real' tomato, rather than a shop bought one, and I can just imagine how good it would taste. Sorry I haven't been around, but I hope to have more time now to spend on things I enjoy, like LJ.
The taste is superiour to store-bought tomatoes, but not as good as you'd expect: it's a bad tomato year, and even the home-grown ones don't have much taste at all.
Love love love the composition and colours of this photograph. Aside from being abstractly beautiful, I also feel these two vegetables have a sort of droll comedy-pairing quality to them, they're so different yet so complementary. The Laurel and Hardy of veggies!
Thank you! *beams* I feel exactly the same. :)