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September 2019

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Lunar Eclipse

ysilme in photo_scavenger

Borrowed

I waited all week to find something nicer for the prompt, but ended up with my first idea after all: in my DIY'er family, we're always borrowing one tool or the other from each other. In the box is my percussion drilling machine (yes, mine, not my husband's ;o) ) my father had borrowed from us for ages, as well as my jig saw he had just for a short time. Usually, it's the other way round and I'm borrowing something from him, though.

Comments

Nothing like good tools:)
That is, of course, very true! :o)
My daughter borrows her dad's power drill. She's quite possibly more at home with it than he is. Thy actually gave them lessons at school in 'design and technology'.
I really envy her! I learnt something useful in the technical way at school, using a sewing machine down to all details. But using power tools would have been so much more practical and useful!
Knowing how to use a sewing machine and, more importantly, how to adjust it to sew different types/thicknesses of fabric properly isn't easy. Well done!

- Erulisse (one L)
You're right, of course, but still it was the wrong idea. We were 12, I was literally the only one interested in learning it (because I was already using a sewing machine at home), and everybody else, particularly the boys, found it boring and stupid. Using a drilling machine - or in most cases even hammer and nails! - would have been more sensible in the long run.
Oooh, big boys' tools! My apartment just has a little teensy toolkit containing little teensy tools.
The same went for me when I was in an apartment. Having a whole house which we fit out mostly ourselves necessitated the need for all those and others! :o)
Love my tools. I'm super careful about who I lend them to, though.

- Erulisse (one L)
Oh, yes, we are, too. Usually, they're not lent outside the family. My father has introduced a helpful way when lending tools out, as he has often been asked to: he attached a tag with the price of the tool and the note "whoever breaks me will have to pay half of this to buy me new." He never got anything back broken.
Oh, now that's brilliant!

- Erulisse (one L)
Ah, Bosch power tools. Nice! We have a few things by that company. Hubby's a mechanic by trade (aviation) and a home improvement nut besides, so I have a lot of head knowledge of tools, though not much in the way of actual expertise in using them.

If I'm not mistaken, we call your percussion drilling machine an impact drill or driver here in the US (though don't hold me to that since all I can see is the case!). Here, percussion drilling machines are big huge rigs pulled by or attached to trucks for boring through rock... so as I kind of doubt they'd fit in a case that size, I'm thinking they're two different things. *g*
Same for me - daughter of home improvement nut. The expertise has rather grown in the last few years, though.

About the terminology bit: I went with what the dictionary gave me, and it doesn't give me anything for impact drill or driver... Wiki says "hammer drill". This is inside the box - a power drill that hammers. Is that the right way to describe it? Finding the correct term for any kind of power or garden tools is a problem in itself.

BTW: Whut? No Aragorn-in-a-helmet-icon? You poor thing! ;o)
Yes, that's what we call an impact driver here. Nomenclature is such a tricky thing when there's different languages and countries involved! :)

BTW: Whut? No Aragorn-in-a-helmet-icon? You poor thing! ;o)

LOL! No, no need for an Aragorn-in-a-hardhat icon. I have my Mike Rowe one that I love (and rarely have a chance to use). He does a lot of voice-over work, and for many years he hosted a show called "Dirty Jobs", in which he took on all kinds of actual jobs here in the US (and for one season, Australia), from sewage plant worker to deep sea fisherman to railway locomotive mechanic and anything you can imagine that involved hard work and filthy and/or dangerous conditions. He'd do his best and usually spectacularly and hilariously fail at doing these jobs and at the same time showcase how well those who do them every day perform. It was really a special show that I wish were still on the air. He really celebrates the value of hard work and though the show isn't on anymore, he still champions the cause all who have jobs where they get their hands (and often everything else) dirty. Neat guy, Mike. :)

Edited at 2013-08-27 01:21 pm (UTC)